Paediatric Speech Pathology

SPOT4YOU and SPOT4KIDS has delivered best-practice Occupational Therapy, Speech Pathology and Psychology services since 1991.

Our Paediatric Speech Pathologists aim to improve communication by targeting the following areas in a fun and creative way.

Pragmatics — the social skills involved in communication

A child needs to know how to interact in different situations and know what is acceptable and not acceptable.

Phonological Awareness — skills that are needed before literacy can develop

For example, counting syllables, rhyming, and breaking words up into all their sounds.

Fluency — the ability to speak without stuttering

We all have occasional dysfluencies in our speech but a child who stutters will have frequent dysfluencies.

Vocal Quality — the sound of the voice

A child with disordered vocal quality may speak with a hoarse or croaky voice, speak as though they have a blocked nose or speak with too much air coming through their nose.

Auditory Perception — the ability to receive and interpret information

This helps children interact with their environment, communicate fluidly, alert them of any potential threats, and makes it possible to enjoy music.

Articulation and Phonology (Speech) — the physical production of sounds

Difficulties with this area may include having trouble saying a variety of sounds, substituting one sound for another sound, or being very difficult to understand when talking.

Expressive, Receptive language

Expressive Language – the use of language through the following areas:

Vocabulary: If a child has a reduced vocabulary or a difficulty retrieving words, they will find it difficult to get their message across clearly and concisely

Grammar: A child needs to use correct word endings such as plurals, past tense and pronouns (e.g., ‘he/she’)

Sentence structures: A child needs to use a range of different types of sentences that are needed for communication

Receptive Language – the understanding of language through the following areas:

Following instructions: A child needs to be able to follow instructions of increasing length accurately
 

Concepts: A child needs to understand what words mean

Word classes: A child needs to understand how words can be categorised and how they relate to one another

Paediatric Speech Pathology

SPOT4YOU and SPOT4KIDS has delivered best-practice Occupational Therapy, Speech Pathology and Psychology services since 1991.

Our Paediatric Speech Pathologists aim to improve communication by targeting the following areas in a fun and creative way.

Pragmatics — the social skills involved in communication

A child needs to know how to interact in different situations and know what is acceptable and not acceptable.

Phonological Awareness — skills that are needed before literacy can develop

For example, counting syllables, rhyming, and breaking words up into all their sounds.

Fluency — the ability to speak without stuttering

We all have occasional dysfluencies in our speech but a child who stutters will have frequent dysfluencies.

Vocal Quality — the sound of the voice

A child with disordered vocal quality may speak with a hoarse or croaky voice, speak as though they have a blocked nose or speak with too much air coming through their nose.

Auditory Perception — the ability to receive and interpret information

This helps children interact with their environment, communicate fluidly, alert them of any potential threats, and makes it possible to enjoy music.

Articulation and Phonology (Speech) — the physical production of sounds

Difficulties with this area may include having trouble saying a variety of sounds, substituting one sound for another sound, or being very difficult to understand when talking.

Expressive, Receptive language

Expressive Language – the use of language through the following areas:

Vocabulary: If a child has a reduced vocabulary or a difficulty retrieving words, they will find it difficult to get their message across clearly and concisely

Grammar: A child needs to use correct word endings such as plurals, past tense and pronouns (e.g., ‘he/she’)

Sentence structures: A child needs to use a range of different types of sentences that are needed for communication

Receptive Language – the understanding of language through the following areas:

Following instructions: A child needs to be able to follow instructions of increasing length accurately
 

Concepts: A child needs to understand what words mean

Word classes: A child needs to understand how words can be categorised and how they relate to one another

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